• 30 Jan
    Louis Dreyfus seeks improved funding deal

    Louis Dreyfus seeks improved funding deal

    With market prices and economic growth remaining slow and with an oversupply of commodities, Louis Dreyfus has been struggling to meet the challenges of the current volatile market place. A planned deal to help reduce funding costs back in November 2016 didn’t materialise but is now back on the table according to sources at Reuters. The signs are that the sector has continued to rally since then and with the recent appointment of a new CFO bringing more direction to the company there is increased confidence that a deal can be done this time round.

    By Caroline Whibley News
  • 02 Jan
    Analysis shows no significant downturn for fruit juice imports into the UK post Brexit

    Analysis shows no significant downturn for fruit juice imports into the UK post Brexit

    Since the UK’s vote to leave the European Union in June 2016 (Brexit), business and industry worldwide has been paying close attention to the possible effects on trade with the UK.

    The fruit juice industry is no different and Fruit Juice Focus (FJF) has been looking at any possible effects on imports of fruit juice into the UK from around the world since the Brexit vote. See tables for year on year comparisons – especially the post Brexit period July to October (highlighted).

    fruit-juice-not-from-concentrate fruit-juice-concentrate

    Orange juice

    Not from concentrate (NFC) orange juice showed a major surge in imports from July to October 2016 both against the previous eight months – November 2015 to June 2016 (Brexit vote), and an even bigger increase year on year for the period (July to October 2016). FJF attributes this fluctuation to the major shortage of orange juice pending due to the poor crop in top-producer brazil. The crop there runs from June to January. Conversely imports of orange juice concentrate continue to show a major decline year on year for the immediate post Brexit period July to October 2016 and against previous months.

    NFC orange juice continues to show good growth in western countries at the expense of reconstituted orange juice. NFC orange juice is more expensive owing to the juice needing to be shipped with significant amounts of water with it. Whereas concentrate, as the name would suggest, has all the water removed before shipping and it is then added back in at the country of destination. The fact that the UK is still registering growth in NFC imports could indicate that UK consumers are not concerned about Brexit, and they see NFC as a premium product and are still prepared to pay for it.

    Apple juice

    Imports of NFC apple juice did not show any change for the four months immediately post Brexit. There had been a steady rise since the end of 2015 and year on year for the July to October 2016 period. For apple juice concentrate there are no significant changes. This could possibly demonstrate that NFC apple juice popularity is following that of orange juice NFC.

    Grapefruit

    NFC grapefruit showed an immediate drop in July 2016 following an unusually high figure for August 2016. Overall the year up to and post Brexit was consistent. Year on year grapefruit NFC and concentrate are both showing a major increase in imports which is not connected to Brexit. FJF finds this surprising as grapefruit juice suffered a significant downturn in popularity between 2000-2010 because it has been linked to adverse reactions when taken with medicine. Grapefruit juice was very popular with the older generation in the United States who have since stopped buying it due to these alleged issues. At the same time the groves in Florida were bought up by real estate firms. So the decline in grapefruit juice has been attributed in the main to reduced production coupled with poor demand. What little juice is offered on the market today is very expensive. But these figures could be a sign that grapefruit is making a come-back?

    Of the remaining three fruit juices analysed – Grape Juice, Pineapple Juice and Lemon Juice (and Lime) the import figures for both NFC and concentrate remain static.

    Source: Fruit Juice Focus analysis from Customs Data

    By Steve Trade Data
  • 02 Jan
    The global market for cold pressed juices is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of over 10% during 2016–2022 says report

    The global market for cold pressed juices is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of over 10% during 2016–2022 says report

    Rising demand for cold pressed juices across the globe can be attributed to increasing awareness about higher nutritional content of cold pressed juices as compared to conventional juices, and increasing health concerns due to growing incidence of lifestyle diseases such as obesity, diabetes, blood pressure, etc. Consumers are increasingly becoming aware about the harmful effects of consuming products manufactured using synthetic ingredients and this is driving the shift towards organically produced food and beverages. Growing awareness about health benefits of consuming organic products, growing annual food and beverages spend per capita, rising infrastructural developments in supply chain and robust distribution network are anticipated to drive global cold pressed juices market through 2022.

    According to the research report Global Cold Pressed Juices Market By Nature, By Type, By Point of Sale, Competition Forecast and Opportunities, 2012-2022, the global market for cold pressed juices is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of over 10% during 2016–2022, on account of increasing online presence of major cold pressed juice manufacturers and shifting focus of manufacturers towards organic fruits and vegetables to extract cold pressed juices. North America dominated the global market for cold pressed juices, followed by Europe, due to high awareness levels among consumers in these regions about advantages of cold pressed juices. Further, PepsiCo’s Naked Juice, Hain Celestial’s BluePrint, Starbuck’s Evolution Fresh, Suja Life, Liquiteria, and others, are a few of the major companies offering cold pressed juices across the globe. Growing demand for cold pressed juices from these companies can be attributed to their vast product offerings and robust distribution network. Moreover, entry of new players, supported by the ever-growing efficient supply chain network and technological advancements are projected to drive growth in the global cold pressed juice market in the coming years. The report was published in December 2016 by TechSci Research.

    Source: TechSci Research

    By Steve News
  • 02 Jan
    Rise in demand for apple juice following changes in regulation

    Rise in demand for apple juice following changes in regulation

    Rules introduced by the Brazilian Agriculture Ministry in 2013 requiring beverage producers to add a minimum of 10% fruit pulp to juice blends has seen a rise in domestic demand for apple juice bringing a major boost to Brazil’s fruit production industry. Apple juice has the benefit of a neutral, sweet flavour and provides soft drink manufacturers the opportunity to introduce the juice to reduce the sugar content.

    For example, a grape soft drink must have a 10% grape juice content but a generic soft drink needs only to have 5%. Nectars have specific percentages ranging from 25% in the pitanga flavour, a Brazilian fruit, to a juice such as peach where the content needs to be up to 40%. Whole juices are unchanged with 100% of the composition being the labelled fruit.

    Fisher, one of Brazil’s leading apple producers report that ‘industries of all sizes are fuelling the growing demand by using apple juice to cut costs in the production of blended beverages’. Arival Pioli, company director, says that “Apple juice is being used in almost all juices, including those with sweeteners. And demand has come from companies of all sizes.” The company expects demand to increase by nearly 50% in the coming year and they are looking to increase sales volumes domestically by 45%, taking the share of apple juice in to 30% in 2017 from 5% today in revenue terms.

    Source: Valor International, Brazil

    By Steve News
  • 02 Jan
    Long Island Iced Tea Corp. announces Oak Beverages to distribute the recently acquired ALO Juice® Brand

    Long Island Iced Tea Corp. announces Oak Beverages to distribute the recently acquired ALO Juice® Brand

    The Long Island Iced Tea Corp. the specialist ready-to-drink (RTD) tea company in the US, has announced that Oak Beverages Inc. has agreed to distribute ALO Juice® which the Company recently agreed to acquire. This is the first new distributorship for the ALO Juice® brand since the announced acquisition by the company in December.

    Philip Thomas, Chief Executive Officer of the Company, stated, “We are thrilled to announce the first new distributorship for the ALO Juice® brand since we announced our proposed acquisition earlier this month. We are committed to building this brand and expanding its distribution in the future.”

    “Beverages such as ALO Juice® carry a functional claim that is a strong fit as Oak Beverages expands into the non-alcoholic arena. We are very excited to be ALO Juice®’s distribution arm in New York” said Manuel P. Bustos, General Manager of Oak Beverages.

    ALO Juice® is a non-alcohol ready-to-drink (NARTD) functional beverage made from juice derived from the aloe plant known as aloe vera. ALO Juice® sources its aloe plants from harvests in Thailand. The plants are exported from there to South Korea where they are processed in a unique whole leaf manner to ensure the nutritional and health benefit are maintained from the plant all the way through to the bottling process. ALO Juice® is packed in 0.5 litre and 1.5 litre bottles, with a wide variety of flavours including Original, Mango, Pomegranate, Pineapple and Raspberry.

    By Steve News
  • 02 Jan
    Imported fruit juices confiscated in Nigeria

    Imported fruit juices confiscated in Nigeria

    The Nigerian National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC) took action during the end of December to back up its policy of banning all imported fruit juices from supermarkets and other food and drink outlets. The ban that came into force on 31st December 2016 is an attempt to strengthen and increase the local fruit juice manufacturing industry.

    “This country is blessed with rich natural and human resources. Fruits are everywhere wasting” said Mrs Christiana Essenwa, Deputy Director of NAFDAC. “Go to waste dumps and see piles of fruits wasting because we have not been able to fully utilise our potentials”.

    Essenwa suggested that some of the juices coming into the country “are not even safe for drinking”, and stated that the agency would continue to carry out raids on imported fruit juices, urging the Nigerian Government to increase its presence at seaports to prevent these products entering the country.

    In Onitsha the value of confiscated imported fruit juices was reported to be worth several million of naira and included juices labelled Masafi, Euro drink and Peach.

    Sources: Vanguard Nigeria; Ships & Ports.

    By Steve News
  • 02 Jan
    Canadian organic juice maker Nothing But Nature acquired by GreenSpace brands

    Canadian organic juice maker Nothing But Nature acquired by GreenSpace brands

    GreenSpace Brands has agreed to purchase Nothing But Nature (owners of the Kiju organic juice brand) for total consideration of approximately USD8.88 million to USD9.88 million. The acquisition offers opportunities for growth through continued product line innovation and expansion and is expected to immediately grow GreenSpace’s earnings and cash flow, with a number of potential synergies that are anticipated to continue to improve EBITDA margins. Nothing But Nature has a very strong balance sheet and currently has no debt outstanding.

    By Steve News
  • 02 Jan
    ‘Disruptive’ Food Processing Technology saves waste and improves nutritional quality

    ‘Disruptive’ Food Processing Technology saves waste and improves nutritional quality

    South African biotechnology and IP Company Green Cell Technologies (GCT), has created a unique solution to overcome the challenges of the need to reduce the excessive amount of waste generated during the food processing cycle. The game-changing Disruptor, using Dynamic Cellular Disruption, provides manufacturers with a compact and cost-saving technology to process their food more expediently, reduce waste, and improve nutritional quality.

    The founders of Green Cell Technologies, Roy Henderson and Jan Vlok, have taken ten years to bring this revolutionary processing machine to market. It is now getting the attention of the world’s food and beverage manufacturers both large and small. Current processing methods generate huge amounts of waste – not only in the material itself, but also in not accessing 100% of the available nutrients.

    GCT’s Disruptor and Dynamic Cellular Disruption(DCD) process change all that. Without using harmful heat or chemicals, the patented process and machinery use wholefoods and plants (skin, pips, seeds, stalks and everything) to generate nutrient rich emulsions, which can be used for a variety of food types – from soups, convenience foods, baby foods and sauces and more importantly juices. The added nutrition is derived from the fact that the Disruptors are able to remove the plant cell membrane, thus releasing 99.99998% of the ‘actives’ inside and all the fibre is taken up into the flowable liquid.

    Trials and demonstrations for local and international food manufacturers has typically shown them “a 60% – 80% increase in the amount of product they can produce, and in many instances even higher, because there is very little to no wastage using DCD” confirmed Roy Henderson, CEO of GCT. In addition to this the taste profile of the material is much enhanced by the opening of all the plant cells.

    The Disruptor (baby two-barrel version) is a 3.2 ton piece of equipment. It’s a commercial proposition with massive export potential for the company – with machines available in 2,4, 6 and 8-barrel configurations. The company want to assist the bulk processors in changing their way of making consumer retail foods and beverages in response to consumers already vocal in their desire and need for healthier foods and drinks.

    Source: Green Cell Technologies

    By Steve News
  • 02 Jan
    Cold pressed charcoal. Will it be the latest new juice to hit the shelves in 2017?

    Cold pressed charcoal. Will it be the latest new juice to hit the shelves in 2017?

    With charcoal based products becoming more readily available in the UK such as charcoal and chia seed-topped bagels and charcoal and sesame seed biscuits being stocked by Waitrose it was only a matter of time before a charcoal based juice arrived.

    Botanic Lab, a London based company are a producer of the juice which includes raw cane grass, lemon juice and yuzu fruit which results in a ‘lemonade’ tasting drink. Waitrose has seen an ongoing climb in sales since it was launched in September last year with a rise of 100 per cent month on month.

    As with all new trends in juices, there is always celebrity take-up and charcoal juice is no different. Amelia Freer who has furthered the careers of many stars (including James Corden) is reported to have explained that charcoal juice “binds with toxins to speed their safe elimination from the body” and rehydrates “more effectively than water”. Charcoal is “poised to become a mainstay of the cleanse ritual”.

    Conversely Charlotte Stirling-Reed, registered nutritionist and media expert for the Nutrition Society, is a bit more cautious urging consumers to be wary and to seek medical advice before taking any supplements containing charcoal as it can affect absorption of medicines and might not be appropriate for breastfeeding and pregnant women.

    Source: Daily Telegraph UK

    By Steve News
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