• 11 May
    Cacao-fruit juice – unlocking the next generation of drinks

    Cacao-fruit juice – unlocking the next generation of drinks

     

     

    The cacaofruit is on the rise and several industries start using this unique fruit for products such as sweet snacks and chocolate. But what is so special about this somehow well-known and at the same time unknown fruit? And what can it do for beverages?

    Everybody knows chocolate and cocoa, but hardly anyone knows where it actually comes from. Chocolate is made from the seeds of the cacaofruit. For centuries, the cacaofruit has been harvested for its seeds (beans). Over time, the association with fruit became lost. However, just like an apple or orange, the cacaofruit has its own uniquely fruity taste. About 14 million tonnes of cacaofruits are harvested around the world each year to craft chocolate. Because only its seeds were used, 70% of the fruit was discarded as waste.

    Cabosse Naturals, a brand of chocolate producer Barry Callebaut, decided this had to change and developed an innovative and unprecedented up-cycling supply chain to harness the natural richness of the cacaofruit. So now not only the seeds, but also the rest of the fruit can be used for multiple purposes and interesting applications in beverages.

    Origins of the fruit

    The journey of the cacaofruit starts in the tropical regions around the Equator on farms where the cacaofruit trees grow. Once ripe, the colourful fruits are harvested by hand, cleaned and opened to remove the seeds (beans) from the fresh white pulp.

    Traditionally, the cacaofruit seeds were used for chocolate, meaning that 70% of the fruit was completely discarded. Now, thanks to Cabosse Naturals, the entire fruit is upcycled. The cacaofruit cascara, which accounts for 45% of the complete cacaofruit, is dried and ground into a fine nutritious flour.

    Fruity flavours

    The cacaofruit pulp is quickly pressed into juice to preserve the fresh aromas of the fruit. Afterwards the cacaofruit juice is filtered, gently pasteurized and concentrated to obtain the cacaofruit juice concentrate.

    Time is of essence in this process and that is why the processing of the pulp needs to be done shortly after the opening of the fruit and close to the farms. The pulp and the juice of this exotic fruit are processed into delicious ingredients which surprise with their unique and zesty fruity flavor.

    The cacaofruit pulp has a clean, fresh white colour and a sweet scent of fruity honey.

    With its pleasant zesty, fruity flavour, the cacaofruit pulp has a uniquely refreshing signature taste that brings natural sweetness and delightfully refreshing fruity notes to beverages, but also ice creams and sorbet. It is a very interesting ingredient for smoothies, since it brings a natural thickness into the products and adds both sweetness and a fruity taste.

    The cacaofruit juice is characterized by a unique zesty fruitiness, making it a very refreshing fruit base for a large range of beverages. It has a golden brown colour with a fruity scent and naturally contains magnesium and potassium. The cacaofruit juice is particularly suited for the usage in beverages such as juice mixes to bring a delicious and exotic flavour.

    The third ingredient for beverage applications, the cacaofruit juice concentrate, adds an intense fruity sweetness and a unique signature flavour to drinks, sorbets and ice creams.

    Opportunity

    With its natural sweetness and zesty fruitiness, cacaofruit is also an interesting ingredient for both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cocktails. Its unique flavor matches well with a wide range of alcoholic beverages and meets the demand for new and exotic flavours.

    Today’s consumers show an increasing interest in health and wellbeing with a desire to live happy, healthy lives. This is particularly important to millennials and centennials, who have distinctive tastes and desires in their food and beverage choices. Their understanding of ‘happiness’ extends beyond themselves and into the world around them. Therefore, food and drinks need to not only be delicious and nutritious, but must also have a positive impact on the planet and its people. Millennials and centennials are making more conscious decisions about the food and beverage choices in their daily life. They want products that are considered to be healthy and that they can feel good about buying.

    With its range of 100% pure cacaofruit ingredients, Cabosse Naturals, unlocks a next generation of food and drinks, that are not only tasty but also nutritious and good for the planet and its people.

    To fully harness the potential of the cacaofruit, Cabosse Naturals teamed up with European B2B-Food-Ingredients Supplier Bösch Boden Spies to promote and supply the European beverage industry with this unique, nutrient rich and exciting upcycled fruit.

    For more information please contact e: dirk.naujoks@BoeschBodenSpies.com
     

    BoeschBodenSpies.com

    By Caroline Calder Features
  • 11 May
    Turkey – Export surge during a pandemic, how long can this drive be maintained?

    Turkey – Export surge during a pandemic, how long can this drive be maintained?

     

    In May of 2019, Fruit Juice Focus told you the story of the rise in Juice exports from Turkey through an introduction to the Turkish Fruit Juice Industry Association (MEYED).  It’s been two years with one of COVID-19. Turkey is back to a nationwide curfew.  Remer Lane reports

    Import and export data

    Juice exports during 2020 from Turkey reached an all-time high of US USD393 million up 151% from 2019 while imported values increased by 567% to an all-time high of USD70 million, up from USD12 million in 2019. The biggest beneficiaries as suppliers to Turkey were China, Iran and Brazil who accounted for 63% of all supply.

    Of this, the primary product from China was Apple Juice Concentrate, from Iran also Apple Juice Concentrate and from Brazil Orange Juice Concentrate. Since, 2015, the Unites States has been the largest recipient of exported juices from Turkey accounting for 38% of total exports by value. Exports to the US between 2019 and 2020 saw a 186% increase in value reaching approximately USD150 million up from USD80 million.

    The key export to the US is Apple Juice Concentrate accounting for 69% of imports at USD102 million. The European Union accounts for 34% of Turkey’s exports of fruit juice at USD135 million, with the Netherlands accounting for 28%, at USD38 million.

    Apple Juice Concentrate accounts for 48% of the EU imports of fruit juice from Turkey followed by an equal amount in mixtures of fruit and vegetable juices. In total, Apple Juice Concentrate is the leader in Turkish juice exports at USD186 million accounting for 47% of total exports followed by Juices of fruits or vegetables unfermented with or without added sweeteners at 38% or USD153 million.

    Apple juice fortunes rise

    In 2019, Turkey overtook Austria to become the 3rd largest supplier or Apple Juice Concentrate to the world market. While China and Poland still lead the global supplier list, their quantities and total values have seen modest reductions while Turkey’s continues to grow. (Data derived from ITC Trade Map).

    Turkish exports of Apple Juice Concentrate (AJC) to the US market in 2021 have shown no let-up from their 2020 surge. Year-to-date as of April 24th, 2021, Turkey follows Chile as the key supplier of Organic Apple Juice Concentrate at USD502 thousand versus Chile at USD638 thousand. As to conventional AJC, Turkey is the leading supplier to the US reaching USD46 million YTD followed by China at USD39 million and Chile at USD16 million. (USDA National Apple Processing Report 29/04/21)

    Key strategies pay off

    Turkey has taken the lessons from Europe and transitioned from a single source supplier to a combination of supplying from their own production and blending with imported product to develop the right acid, colour and flavour profiles sought by US and EU buyers giving them the ability to improve their competitiveness and grow their market share. We look forward to seeing just how far Turkey can grow.

    What does the future hold . . .

    There are challenges ahead and the continued devaluation of the Turkish Lira to the USD and EURO from its peak in 2008 to today has been dramatic. The sharpest fall came in 2018 with a 34% fall against the USD with inflation shooting above 25%. In March of 2021, the Turkish Lira crashed again falling 15% against the USD with the sacking of the country’s central banker who was tightening monetary policy. Inflation is currently at 15% and interest rates are at 19%. How long Turkey can maintain their export surge and competitive supply should be taken with a cautionary grain of salt for global buyers.

    By Caroline Calder Features
  • 11 May
    The market for ‘Water Plus’ – where juice is concerned

    The market for ‘Water Plus’ – where juice is concerned

     

    ‘Water plus’ drinks typically capture the market of consumers seeking a tastier and more varied alternative to plain water, writes Christina Avison, Associate Director – Commercial at Zenith Global. They also provide a healthier alternative to carbonated soft drinks (CSDs).

    Water plus products are divided into three main segments: flavoured water, functional water and juicy water. Natural ingredients including fruit juice content are highly valued by adopters of water plus for flavour enhancement and for providing ‘clean’ ingredients.

    The water plus market in the UK struggled in 2020, dominated by the impact of the global coronavirus crisis. The restrictions that were put in place to curb the infection rate of the virus that most affected water plus consumption were the closure of the hospitality and leisure channels. Alongside this, the requirement for people to stay local and work from home, where possible, resulted in a drop in impulse shopping.

    To a certain extent, demand shifted to take home grocery retail, however, this was not enough to prevent a significant overall volume decline as the number of consumer purchase occasions were restricted. At the same, many also switched to tap water with added flavourings like squash, cordials and juice to replace flavoured still water whilst at home. All of these factors combined contributed to reduce the overall market volume and value.

    Volume market headlines

    Total water plus consumption declined by 12% to 450 million litres in 2020. This equated to per capita consumption of 6.6 litres, down by 1 litre per person, from 7.6 litres in the previous year.

    Flavoured water was the largest segment by volume, with 390 million litres sold, accounting for 87% of total sector volume, up from 86% in 2019. Despite making market share gain, its annual volume fell for the second consecutive year, by nearly 11%, performing ahead of the wider water plus market.

    The juicy water segment fell at a rate of 17% to 45 million litres in 2020. This equates to a 10% share of the total water plus market.

    Functional water saw its volumes fall back from 16.5 million litres in 2019 to 13.5 million litres in 2020. This meant it had a share of 3% of the total water plus market. With a volume decline of 18%, functional water was the most significant hit sector by the pandemic.

    Value worse hit by the pandemic

    Looking at value performance, it is juicy water – with its high exposure to convenience and impulse – that suffered the worst in 2020. The value declined by 38%, dropping from £150 million in 2019 to £93 million in 2020.

    Functional water faired a little better but was impacted most by both the closure of gyms and the drop in impulse demand, falling by 26% to £34 million in 2020.

    Flavoured water held up better due to its higher presence in the retail take home segment and significantly lower price point. A staple of supermarket water aisles, flavoured water overall declined nearly 17% on 2019 to reach £303 million.

    Fizz forges ahead

    Still water plus volumes slipped last year, meanwhile sparkling water plus also declined but to a lesser extent, increasing market share from 34% to 36%. This was largely driven by new seltzer launches and the rapid adaptability of canned sparkling water plus brands to move towards case pack online sales during the pandemic.

    Sparkling water drinks across both plain and plus also appealed to a number of new customers, as consumers who were unable to dine out sought to elevate the at-home dining experience by purchasing more sparkling beverages to accompany their meal.

    Juicy water and the soft seltzer trend

    The UK juicy water segment is dominated by the leading two brands, Drench Juicy, produced by Britvic, and Volvic Juicy, produced by Danone Waters. Together, these brands command half of the segment in the UK and both are still water brands.

    There is still huge space for juicy waters in the market as well as growth potential in the future. Especially of interest is the expanding sparkling juicy water segment with brands like Nichols-owned Feel Good Drinks (which contain 15% real fruit juice), Danone’s Volvic L’mon (25% fruit juice), Britvic’s Aqua Libra, Nestlé Waters’ San Pellegrino Essenza, and Le Joli from AG Barr.

    Also making waves are those brands without big corporate backing, like Dash Water, Ugly Water and Dalston’s Seltzers.

    These are often referred to as ‘soft seltzers’; beverages that tend to attract a different type of consumer from traditional water plus, providing that ‘cold can’ feeling that sodas provide, but without any sugar or artificial ingredients as found in sugary soft drinks.

    This acceleration of healthier water drinks with higher juice content and low- or no-added sugar, largely driven by the UK Soft Drinks Industry Levy, has helped consumers become more familiar with less sweet drinks, and are educating their palettes to a dryer, less-sweet taste.

    The challenge in this space is both internal and external perception; are these high-juice, low-sugar products premium sparkling flavoured waters or sparkling juicy waters, soft seltzers, fruitful sparkling waters or adult soft drinks? The category lines are most definitely blurring and consumers and producers alike differ on terminology.

    And once you add other things to water, when does it stop being a water drink?

    Zenith Global’s UK Water Drinks Reports 2021, covering plain, flavoured, functional and juicy waters are available to purchase from www.zenithglobal.com/market-insights/reports.

     

    Zenith Global’s Water Plus Definitions

    Flavoured water

    Sweetened with sugar, sweetener or unsweetened with added fruit essence; sparkling and still natural mineral, spring or bottled drinking water with added flavourings.

    Functional water

    Functional waters have added functional ingredients, such as botanicals, vitamins, minerals, oxygen or others. Functional waters can be still or sparkling and can be flavoured or unflavoured. Such waters are marketed as having a functional positioning.

    Juicy water

    Defined as water with added juice, juice content ranges from 5% to 25-30%. However, the key attribute is consumer perception of such products as being water plus juice as opposed to a juice drink. These drinks are perceived by consumers to be closer to flavoured waters than juices/nectars.

    Water plus

    Water plus includes flavoured waters, functional waters and juicy waters as defined above.

    By Caroline Calder Features
  • 11 May
    Global – Transparency on sustainable juice through new JuicyChain Foundation

    Global – Transparency on sustainable juice through new JuicyChain Foundation

    Eckes-Granini and Refresco have established the new named ‘JuicyChain Foundation’. This is a non-profit organization with the purpose of making the global juice supply chain more sustainable. The foundation will manage and further develop the JuicyChain, which is an open source block-chain-based traceability and transparency platform.

    The new platform, based on The New Fork’s open food chain platform, was designed to create added value for all parties involved in the juice supply chain: from growers to processors, bottlers, brand owners, retailers and consumers, say the Foundation. JuicyChain supports a move towards a significant increase in availability of sustainable juice in the marketplace. All companies in the juice industry can join and share information about sustainable juice easily and efficiently. Consumers and other stakeholders will be able to examine provenance and sustainability data by scanning a unique QR code on a finished juice product.

    The New Fork has developed the platform blueprint and are the JuicyChain Foundation’s IT Provider. This block-chain-based platform brings transparency to the efforts to increase the sustainability of juice in the industry. Coert Michielsen, CPO at Refresco says: “By teaming up with others we can move faster towards a common goal of more sustainable juice supply chains and promote the uptake of sustainable juice across the supply chain.” Refresco

    By Caroline Calder News
  • 11 May
    UK – Drinking beetroot juice may promote healthy ageing

    UK – Drinking beetroot juice may promote healthy ageing

    A new study has found that drinking beetroot juice promotes a mix of mouth bacteria associated with healthier blood vessels and brain function. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Redox Biology’. Beetroot – and other foods including lettuce, spinach, and celery – are rich in inorganic nitrate, and many oral bacteria play a role in turning nitrate into nitric oxide, which helps to regulate blood vessels and neurotransmission (chemical messages in the brain).

    Older people tend to have lower nitric oxide production, and this is associated with poorer vascular (blood vessel) and cognitive (brain) health. In the new study, by the University of Exeter, 26 healthy older people took part in two ten-day supplementation periods: one with nitrate-rich beetroot juice and another with nitrate-free placebo juice, which they drank twice a day.

    The results showed higher levels of bacteria associated with good vascular and cognitive health, and lower levels of bacteria linked to disease and inflammation. Systolic blood pressure dropped on average by five points (mmHg) after drinking the beetroot juice. “We are really excited about these findings, which have important implications for healthy ageing,” said lead author Professor Anni Vanhatalo, of the University of Exeter.

    “Previous studies have compared the oral bacteria of young and older people, and healthy people compared to those with diseases, but ours is the first to test nitrate-rich diet in this way,” added Vanhatalo. “Our findings suggest that adding nitrate-rich foods to the diet – in this case via beetroot juice – for just ten days can substantially alter the oral microbiome (mix of bacteria) for the better. Maintaining this healthy oral microbiome in the long term might slow down the negative vascular and cognitive changes associated with ageing.”

    The researchers ran tests to identify clusters or ‘modules’ of oral bacteria that tend to thrive together in similar conditions. A module (Prevotella-Veillonella) that has been associated with inflammation was reduced after nitrate supplementation, including a decrease of Clostridium difficile (which can infect the bowel and cause diarrhoea).

    Much research has been conducted into the benefits of a healthy gut microbiome, but far less is known about the oral microbial community, which plays a crucial role in “activating” the nitrate from a vegetable-rich diet. Siasat

    By Caroline Calder News
  • 11 May
    Europe – Tethered ‘caps’ could make a difference to waste management

    Europe – Tethered ‘caps’ could make a difference to waste management

    SIG has announced that tethered caps will be launched for its beverage cartons in Europe in the second half of 2021, ahead of the July 2024 deadline set by EU regulations. In addition, customers choosing the company’s SIGNATURE packaging solutions will receive tethered caps made from polymers linked to renewable, forest-based materials.

    SIG’s tethered caps will be launched initially for the closures used for its most popular packs in Europe. The tethered domeTwist will be available for SIG’s carton bottle combidome, as well as tethered combiMaxx and tethered combiSwift options for SIG’s core family-size carton portfolio. Together, these account for around 90% of SIG’s European closures by volume.

    The new tethered caps are designed to be used with existing SIG filling lines and closure applicators, with no major capital expenditure required by customers. Indeed, compatibility with existing SIG filling lines and customers’ existing packaging designs, secondary packaging and logistics was reportedly a key consideration in the design of the caps.

    When the pack is opened for pouring, the cap can be firmly fixed at the desired position by pressing it down until it clicks. This means the consumer can pour from the pack without the cap getting in the way and without needing to hold down the cap with their fingers. To close the pack, the cap is simply lifted slightly before closing in the usual way. PackagingEurope

    By Caroline Calder News
  • 11 May
    US – Measuring OJ Marketing Success

    US – Measuring OJ Marketing Success

    For years, the Florida Department of Citrus measured the success of its orange juice marketing programs by comparing year-over-year data, Florida Citrus Commission Chairman Steve Johnson stated in a recent message to growers. The Citrus Commission is the governing board for the FDOC.

    “Then the (COVID-19) pandemic stopped everyone in their tracks,” Johnson stated. “Suddenly consumers were turning to 100% orange juice with renewed fervour.” But now, Johnson added, “Consumers are no longer stockpiling food for fear of lockdowns or scarcity. The sales increases experienced in those early days were not only unsustainable but unlikely to be repeated again. To compare today’s sales to those of last year would lose sight of the actual momentum gained over the course of a year. So, instead, we’re looking at the big picture provided by a 3-year comparison report with figures from 2019, 2020 and 2021 for a true sense of the momentum we have achieved.”

    Johnson reported that for the 4-week period ending March 20, average sales of total OJ are up by 3.38% compared to 2019 values. He said not-from-concentrate (NFC) OJ is “a driving force” in that increase. NFC sales are up 6.52% compared to 2019, while average sales of reconstituted OJ are down by 2.7%.

    “Looking at the 2020-21 season as a whole, which began in October, sales continue to be up 5% over 2019-20,” Johnson added. “This is due to the inclusion of pandemic months within the time period. The current season is up 7.77% when compared to 2018-19 values.” He noted that NFC sales are up 8.6% and reconstituted sales are down by 1.5%.

    “While we continue to have momentum that is carrying us above 2019 sales levels, it won’t stay that way without effort on our part,” Johnson wrote. “The need for further investment in marketing activities to keep Florida OJ top of mind is critical as consumers return to their pre-pandemic routines … The department is planning for that and more as they look ahead to the next year.” Florida Department of Citrus

    By Caroline Calder News