• 16 Sep
    Juice transportation excellence

    Juice transportation excellence

     

    Safe transportation of truit juices on the high seas

    Ziemann Holvrieka show how it equips cargo ship with juice tanks

    In order to transport fresh juices and juice concentrates as efficiently as possible, Citrosuco, the largest global producer of orange juice concentrate, relies on tanks and process technology from the plant manufacturer Ziemann Holvrieka. The equipment was installed on the cargo ship MV Citrus Vita Brasil, which is now tailor-made and designed for the transport of juices. 27 million litres of juice can be transported from Santos in Brazil to the United States and Europe in a total of 15 tanks.

    In the maritime industry, innovation is often achieved through conversion and this is what happened in the development of MV Citrus Vita Brasil: The container ship MV Hermes Arrow, was converted into a combined juice tanker for not-from-concentrate (NFC) and for concentrate orange juice (FCOJ). Eight tanks are for dedicated solely to NFC and seven double-purpose tanks used for loading NFC and FCOJ. The new juice tanker, which is the length of two football fields, is capable of holding 7 million gallons of juice, equivalent to a capacity of 27,000 m³. The ship was a former container ship without cooling system. The old construction, used for accommodating containers, had to be removed along with the hatch covers. After inserting the new vertical stainless steel tanks into the insulated holds, an additional double bottom and new shelter deck were fitted and a new cooling system was installed.

    Perfected Aseptic Tank Engineering

    The stainless steel used for the tanks complies with the highest DIN standards. Moreover, the inner surface, meaning the complete inner tank welding, strictly conforms to ASME standards: 0.8 μm Ra and zero indication.

    The ship’s cargo tanks are cylindrical units with vertical axes. The bottom of each tank slopes to a definite lower point; while the top is slightly conical. The pipework is connected to the lowest point to facilitate complete draining of the tanks. Propeller-type tank agitators ensure circulation of the tank contents when NFC orange juice is being carried.

    Cargo pumps are installed at the bottom of the cargo hold between the cargo tanks. Frequency-controlled, electrically driven centrifugal pumps are used to handle the NFC orange juice, while a wider pipework system and a series of frequency-controlled, electrically driven positive displacement pumps support the FCOJ process. Radar level gauges determine how much product is in the tanks, and nitrogen pipes deliver nitrogen to fill the headspace in the tanks. Temperature sensors are used to monitor the cooling system.

    A protective atmosphere of nitrogen is used in all tanks and pipework systems to assure the juice quality. The ship has an on-board nitrogen tank to provide a suitable buffer for maintaining appropriate levels in the tanks and pipework while at sea. Nitrogen is pumped into the tanks from a ship-based source when juice is discharged at the port.

    Special diaphragm and sealing solutions are integrated into valves to ensure sterility. Larger valves which cannot be sealed with diaphragms are equipped with valve rod seals fit with alcohol reservoirs to support volume changes and wiping action on exposed sections of the valve. Flanges are designed according to the highest aseptic standards to eliminate cavities where bacteria could form. “This guarantees that the juice is not contaminated by harmful microorganisms”, explains Jurgen Stuijts, International Sales Manager Juice & Beverages at Ziemann Holvrieka.

    Customized tank cleaning systems ensure aseptic conditions during cleaning and disinfection of the large tanks. Fresh water for cleaning and rinsing of the tanks is supplied via a separate fresh water tank installed in the forward part of the vessel. After cleaning, the empty tanks are filled with nitrogen to ensure sterility.

    Customized Process Technology

    All calculations and layouts were approved and released in advance by an independent classification society. This ensures that all components meet the high standards required for transport vessels in the juice industry. Only when a ship meets all specifications at the time of completion, it receives complete certification. Without it is not permitted to sail. Jurgen Stuijts describes the particular challenge posed during installation of the tanks: “Every ship is built differently, so the arrangement of load points varies. The tanks stand on a foundation which must be mounted exactly on these load points. The installation is therefore a tailored solution.”

    Electrically driven refrigerant compressors were installed in the deckhouse. Brine from the evaporator room circulates through the heat exchangers in each hold, with large fans providing air to all parts of the insulated holds through strategically placed ductwork. Juice is loaded at the required temperature, and the refrigerating system has the capacity to maintain this temperature, no matter what ambient conditions are encountered during the voyage. The cooling capability of the equipment is 5° C to -10° C. The ship is also equipped with an emergency generator, designed to protect the cargo in the event of a electrical failure.

    Additionally, state-of-the-art measuring and control technology, circulation pumps and discharge pumps were installed, along with a nitrogen system to provide a nitrogen gas cushion in the filled tanks above the cargo. A stand-alone CIP system was included in the process installation. A double piping system was installed for the combined transportation of NFC and FC orange juice.

    In case of MV Citrus Vita Brasil, an additional request was for a development and construction timeframe of 10 months – and this target was met. 

    Reliable support that leads to success

    The automation of MV Citrus Vita Brasil is cutting edge to ensure correct processes and the required asepticism. Human error can be eliminated as a result of this automation system. In particular, electronically controlled processes for filling and emptying of the tanks have been improved to ensure the sterility of the end product.

    The cargo system of the fruit juice carrier is equipped with clean-in-place and sterilize-in-place installations. Stainless steel pipe manifolds are used on board and on shore during loading and unloading of the ship. Food grade hoses connect the two manifolds. However, the piping manifolds and hoses must be sterilized before the product is pumped through them. Ziemann Holvrieka provides training for the crew to reduce the risk of contamination with microorganisms when sterilization is not realized properly.

    Smooth cooperation with a happy ending

    “This was a unique project for us. Citrosuco’s experience in ship management combined with our know-how in the construction of special tanks ensures high quality,” explains Jurgen Stuijts. “Citrus Vita Brasil will provide greater transport capacity and greater flexibility in the distribution of orange juice to our customers to meet the demand of different markets,” said Mário Bavaresco Júnior, President of Citrosuco, in a statement.

    Visit us at the Juice Summit 2019 at the 1st and 2nd October 2019 in Antwerpen, Belgium.

    By Caroline Calder Features
  • 16 Sep
    From sweet to savoury: how vegetables are transforming fruit juice

    From sweet to savoury: how vegetables are transforming fruit juice

     

    Johan Cerstiaens, Commercial Director at SVZ provides some insight

    From breakfast go-to, to post-gym treat, fruit juice is a staple for millions of consumers globally. As a beverage that is marketed as healthy and natural, it is especially enjoyed by busy consumers who see it as a way to easily consume essential minerals and vitamins. Supermarket aisles reflect this popularity, boasting a broad range of colourful combinations to suit all tastes and preferences: from conventional flavours like orange and apple to blends including red berries, tropical flavours or superfruits.

    Are juices too sweet?

    In recent years fruit juice has slightly fallen from grace. While many brands have reformulated to remove added sugar, due to the high levels of naturally occurring sweetness in juice, even completely natural drinks have been caught up in the recent ‘sugar backlash’ that has swept the food and drink industry. Fruit juice has therefore presented somewhat of a dilemma for manufacturers and health policy makers, as they try to ensure the reduction of sugar content in drinks, whilst still recognising the health benefits of juice. For example, while both Public Health England and UNESDA, the Union of European Soft Drinks, have included fruit juice as part of their sugar reduction programmes, products which contain 100% fruit juice are currently exempt from the UK’s sugar tax.

    Concerns about the sugar content of fruit juice aren’t just coming from regulatory authorities, however. As consumers pay more attention to their health and wellbeing, they are increasingly looking for high-quality, natural drinks which deliver nutritional and even psychological benefits as well as a great taste. This demand for healthy, multi-benefit drinks represents a great opportunity for both juice manufacturers and ingredient suppliers to find innovative new ways to satisfy consumers’ changing needs.

    Despite the challenges facing the industry, juice is still immensely popular with younger consumers, with recent research from Kantar finding that 36% of respondents drank juice daily. The appetite for fruit juice is evidently still there, so how can both manufacturers and brands delight consumers while satisfying calls for more variety and less natural sweetness?

    Vegetables hold the answer

    Amid all the concern about the sugar content of fruit juice, it makes sense for brands to turn to vegetable-based blends. With a more savoury flavour, vegetables have less sugar and calories than fruit, while still being rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Encouragingly, almost 40% of those surveyed by Kantar felt positive about juices and smoothies containing vegetables. In fact, many consumers have already been exposed to vegetable-based drinks and juices in supermarkets – Cawston Press and Innocent for example, have been selling ‘brilliant beetroot’ and ‘easy greens’ juices respectively for years.

    The veg juice trend also extends to the largest industry players. The Coca Cola Company for example have been exploring more savoury flavours with its recently launched 100% vegetable juice Minute Maid range, which features flavours such as tomato, carrot, celery, cucumber and beetroot. In the UK, Morrisons has recently added to its chilled juice range with an orange and carrot blend, whilst cold-pressed ‘raw’ smoothie brand Savsé combine superfruits such as blueberries with beetroot, kale, spinach in their ‘super blue’ drink.

    Grown-up tastes

    By exploring more savoury flavours – in combination with, or replacing, the sweet – manufacturers are not only cutting back on sugar content. They’re also appealing to consumers with more adventurous palates, who want to push their taste experiences beyond the norm.

    Also, with less and less young people drinking alcohol –19% of those in the 16-24 age bracket report they do not drink at all – vegetable-based blends are a soft drink alternative to alcohol that is more suited to grown-up palates.[1] English juice manufacturer Pixley Berries, for example, is specifically catering to this market through a range of blends and flavours including a beetroot and rhubarb juice that is ‘naturally low in sugar’.

    The future of juice

    With fruit juice still a recommended element of a healthy, balanced diet, it’s undeniable that concerns surrounding sweet drinks are motivating manufacturers to explore more savoury juice flavours. By utilising ingredients such as spinach, celery, beetroot and carrot in their juices, brands will be able to naturally reduce sugar content, while also attracting adventurous consumers and those who are looking for more ‘adult’ soft drink alternatives.

    Here at SVZ, our portfolio of premium, sustainably sourced ingredients allows producers to create innovative new flavour combinations to excite their customers. By taking advantage of our high-quality vegetable ingredients for their juices, manufacturers can rest assured that they will not only cut back on sugar content but also provide consumers with the best possible taste.

     

    For further information please contact Dejan Trifunovic

    SVZ International BV, email:

    dejan.trifunovic@svz.com

     

     

    By Caroline Calder Features
  • 16 Sep
    Global – Pomegranate juice good for brain developme

    Global – Pomegranate juice good for brain developme

     

    A new study published in the journal PLOS One has claimed that drinking pomegranate juice during pregnancy may improve brain development and connectivity in unborn babies.

    Pomegranate juice contains disease-fighting antioxidants – polyphenols that are neuroprotective in nature. Polyphenols like tannic acid and ellagitannins are known to cross the blood-brain barrier and are found in many foods and beverages, including nuts, berries, red wine and teas. Pomegranate juice contains disease-fighting antioxidants – polyphenols that are neuroprotective in nature

    Senior author of the study, Terrie Inder from Brigham and Women’s hospital in the US said, “Our study provides preliminary evidence suggesting potential protective effects for newborns exposed to pomegranate juice while in the womb. These findings warrant continued investigation into the potential neuroprotective effects of polyphenols in at-risk newborns, such as those with hypoxic-ischemic injury.”Food.ndtv

    By Caroline Calder News
  • 16 Sep
    USA –  Florida citrus production and crop value is up from a year ago

    USA –  Florida citrus production and crop value is up from a year ago

    Production is up vs a year ago, when the industry was trying to recover after being hit hard by Hurricane Irma. But the industry continues to bleed acreage in the state, according to numbers released by the US Department of Agriculture.

    The federal agency’s commercial citrus inventory recorded 430,601 acres spread across 25 counties, 4% fewer acres than a year ago. The net loss of 16,411 acres is more than twice what was lost last season,” the federal agency noted.

    The overall total acreage this year was the lowest since the survey started in 1966.

    Only Sarasota County posted an increase in acres being used commercially to grow oranges, grapefruit and specialty crops such as tangerines, tangelos and lemons.

    The USDA reports said new plantings accounted for 10,068 acres, off 17% from a year ago, and that the 61.4 million trees were 2% fewer than the prior season.

    Growers during the 2017-2018 growing season posted 75-year lows because of damage caused by Hurricane Irma, which hammered much of the state in September 2017. The hurricane caused massive damage in key counties for the citrus industry, uprooting trees and leaving many groves in standing water.

    During the recently completed 2018-2019 season, the industry continued battling deadly citrus-greening disease and factors such as an expansion of development into rural areas and changes in national drinking habits.

    But the 2018-2019 season saw a 59% increase in orange production from the 2017-2018 season and a 4% increase from the 2016-2017 season, which was not devastated by a hurricane.

    The production in the most-recent growing season, from September 2018 to July 2019, had a preliminary USD873 million on-tree value for the citrus crops, 37% more than the USD637 million revised value for 2017-2018, according to the US Department of Agriculture. Fox35orlando

    By Caroline Calder News
  • 16 Sep
    UK – Fruit juice consumption on the up

    UK – Fruit juice consumption on the up

    The manufacture of fruit and vegetable juice was the fastest growing sub sector in the UK food industry, growing 17% from £654 million in 2017 to £768 million in 2018.

    Research shows that more than half of people aged 16 to 24 consume juice drinks at least once a day. Consumption of smoothies has seen the biggest increase among all fruit juice drinks with Brits spending £112 million alone on these last year alone.

    Sales of UK manufactured beer have meanwhile hit their lowest level in a decade at £3.1 billion – down from £3.7 billion the year before – as young people increasingly turn to alcohol free alternatives. Beer sales reached their peak in 2009, when Brits consumed £4.8 billion in beer.

    Food and drink remained the largest UK manufacturing sector in 2018, reporting sales of £71.8 billion – a 3% increase on 2017. Overall UK manufacturing sales hit a record high of £390.1 billion in 2018 – an increase of £9.4 billion (2.5%) from the previous year.

    Andrew Williams, Head of Food & Drink Sector, Santander UK, said: “Food and drink manufacturing is vital to the health of the economy and the UK is widely seen as a global leader in product innovation. The last decade has seen the food and drink industry shaken up with huge shifts in consumer buying habits – from growing interest in veganism to juice and smoothie diets. Manufacturers are having to respond quicker than ever to develop new products to meet customer demand – a pattern which is likely to continue as Brits explore the latest food fads.” BMmagazine

    By Caroline Calder News