• 16 May
    Fruit juice tastes so good for Turkey

    Fruit juice tastes so good for Turkey

    Editor Caroline Calder finds out how the Turkish fruit juice industry is fairing today, with some key questions to juice association MEYED.

    “In the last five years Turkey has shown a significant hunger for imported products, and this trend is mainly driven by urbanisation,” Euromonitor International nutrition analyst Dimitrious Dimakakkos commented in a recent interview.

    “This has resulted in the traditional food markets being substituted by modern grocery retailers, and multinational branded products (have) found more space on the shelves of supermarkets.”

    Reports say that 18.9% of Turkey’s GDP is taken up by the food and beverage industry. Why? Turkey is the ideal location for agriculture production. The nation is the seventh largest agricultural producer in the world, for a wide variety of products. Turkey is also a heavy importer to cater to a huge internal market of 76 million people, and an important hub for producers to reach the Middle Eastern and North African markets around it.

    CC- When was the association founded? 

     MEYED – The Turkish Fruit Juice Industry Association (MEYED) has been established in 1993 in order to bring the companies in the Turkish fruit juice industry together under the same roof. As the only representative of the industry, MEYED has 39 members.

    From the first day of its foundation, MEYED has brought industry’s stakeholders from the areas of agriculture, food processing and health, expert academicians and the professionals from the industry together in order to put forward solutions for the common issues and contribute to the development of the industry.

    CC – What has changed over the years?

    MEYED – Our industry and our association has continued to grow every year. Many new companies have joined us during this period. With the developing technological infrastructure, products of the desired quality are produced and exported.

    The export of fruit juice industry started with symbolic figures in the 1970s but by the 2000s it had a big increase. In 2018, the export value approached 300 million dollars. Today we export our products to more than 130 countries.

    CC – Who are your members typically? 

    MEYED – members are all the fruit juice producers and some supplier companies from packaging and auxiliary material industries.

    Most of the products produced for export are concentrates and widely exported concentrate types are like apple, citrus, cherry, pomegranate.

    In the domestic market, consumers prefer mostly nectar types such as peach, apricot and cherry. Producers focus on production in line with the preferences of consumers. However, they are not limited to them, many product options are offered to the consumers.

    CC – What are the biggest challenges for your members that you can help with? Geography, politics, transport, trade?

     

    MEYED – One of the most important issues in our industry is the losses in the raw material supply chain. In order to find a solution to this problem, it is important to work in coordination with farmers and other stakeholders.

    Before the harvest period, agriculture and procurement experts come together to determine the yield estimates for that year. The whole sector designs the logistics and production processes in a coordinated way. MEYED creates the necessary environment to provide them to work together.

    CC – What aspects are unique to the Turkish industry?

    MEYED – Consumers around the world mostly drink orange juice. But consumers in Turkey generally prefer the nectars. The most preferred flavour is peach nectar, it is followed by cherry and apricot nectar. The industry offers products to the market in accordance with these preferences. Turkey has an important position in the world in the production of concentrates of these products.

    CC – Where do you see growth for the industry

    MEYED – Fruit juice and nectar consumption in Turkey is about 8-9 liters per person in a year. It is still quite low compared to other countries.

    But Turkish fruit juice market is growing rapidly and with the effect of healthy nutrition trend, consumption in our country is expected to continue to increase.

    CC – Do you get involved in marketing and branding?

    MEYED – We have a digital platform where we promote fruit juice with its positive impacts on agriculture, economy, nutrition. We believe in continuous communication based on scientific facts and statistical figures.

     Round up of export and Import trade

     Turkey’s Fruit Juice Foreign Trade (Million $);

    [Import and export trade – fig 1]

    The availability of large quantities of fruit allowed the establishment of exportoriented, sophisticated and efficient fruit juice plants in Turkey. Exports of fruit juices and concentrates started with a symbolic quantity of 6 tonnes in 1970, and after that showed a rapid and steady increase, reaching approximately 103 thousand tons in 2012. Generally, apple, citrus (mainly orange) and pomegranate juice concentrates are produced for exporting. In addition to them, sour cherry juice and some fruit nectars, mainly peach and apricot, are produced for the domestic market and some are exported as well.

    The Netherlands and Germany constituted 35% of Turkish fruit juices and concentrates exports in 2012. The United Kingdom, the USA and Italy were among the key export markets in 2012.

    The growth of opportunity for exports is obvious, just looking at total imports of agricultural products from Turkey to the USA in 2018 the figure totalled USD1 billion. Leading categories included: processed fruit & vegetables (USD191 million), tobacco (USD173 million), snack foods (USD121 million), other vegetable oils (USD116 million), and fruit & vegetable juices (USD89 million).

     

    Background:

    The fruit juice and concentrate industry has become one of the progressive agroindustry sectors in Turkey. This export-oriented industry has flourished rapidly due to the modern production units, new investments and strong support of abundant fresh fruit production. Fruit juices of various types (concentrated, mixed, sweetened etc.) are very popular primarily because of their nutrient content. The products of this sector are also good alternatives to carbonated beverages.

    Fruits processed into fruit juice and concentrates are apples, pears, apricots, peaches, oranges, tangerines, grapefruits, lemons, sour cherries, strawberries, pomegranates and grapes.

    Meyed.org.tr, ustr.gov, foodturkey.com.tr

    By Caroline Calder Features
  • 16 May
    IFU Technical Conference – Athens

    IFU Technical Conference – Athens

    A report on findings of the 6 March workshop, by IFU Executive Director John Collins

    The annual IFU Technical Workshop (in conjunction with SGF and AIJN) took place on the 6th March at the Electra Palace Hotel close to the Parthenon in Greece.

    Dirk Lansbergen, IFU President, welcomed the large international crowd including juice colleagues from North and South America who came to enjoy a wide range of technically informative presentations. IFU are grateful to Biosystems of Spain for their sponsorship of the workshop, who also had a display area showing their range of enzymatic based test kits. It was followed by a Greek networking dinner at the Garden of Zappion, which was sponsored again by GfL Laboratories and KSY blends for the first time. During dinner the IFU commission excellence award was presented to Dr David Hammond for his dedicated contributions to the Methods of Analysis Commission and Legislation Commission.

    ‘cans are the most

    recycled beverage

    container in the world’

     Workshop – focus on sustainability

    The IFU workshop first session consisted of a series of short presentations, followed by a panel discussion with questions from the audience on the Sustainability of Packaging. It was opened by Norman Gierow if SIG who showed that SIG have 2 sustainable carton alternatives utilising plant-based polymers which won the 2018 German Packaging sustainability award. They also offer the world’s first alternative straw solution, the straight paper straw, designed for the beverage carton. Next Tim Neal of O-I reminded us that glass bottles are 100% natural, reusable and infinitely recyclable, being a circular economy champion for over 40 years. He also included information on the technological evolution of glass manufacturing.

    Claudia Bierth from Ball Packaging Europe stated that cans were the perfect choice for the circular economy and in fact cans are the most recycled beverage container in the world. It was shown that the carbon footprint of cans has significantly improved since the 1980’s.  With high recycling rates and additional user benefits of fast and efficient filling plus favourable logistic solutions cans should be considered for packing juices.

    Although not from the packaging industry David Berryman presented some of the challenges faced by the significant use of plastic materials in the supply chain. He gave an example of the successful recycling efficiency of PET achieved in Germany as a model to perhaps follow and also how the industry as a whole may move forward switching from petrochemical sources to renewable materials and how plastic waste may be broken down by the use of enzymes.

    A robust debate amongst the panel and with the audience closed the session leaving the participants with insights of the sustainable comparisons suited for different needs and the opportunities for improved sustainability.

    A question of sugar

    Our next session concerned the processing of juices and juice-based beverages. There has been much ill-informed comment in the media about the natural levels of sugar present in pure juices. Dr Martin Foltz of Doehler gave an overview of that communication landscape and then provided a technological review of how sugar levels may be reduced, considering the impact on product design and legal status. Apart from product reformulation there are opportunities with fermentation/bio transformation and physical separation. A number of products are available to the consumer that are clear in appearance, however without careful manufacturing controls, undesirable hazes and clouds may develop.

    Professor Dr Frank Will of Hochshule Geisenheim University provided a detailed explanation of the main aspects to control and the necessary analysis required to complement them. Being in Greece we were delighted that Mario Chronis from Aspis could give us an overview of how the Greek fruit processing industry has developed, the range of products available and challenges faced in the future. We then had a chance to see operations in action the following day with a Technical Tour to the Aspis factory included a tasting of some of their tasteful juices.

    ‘The new combination of

    micro filtration with heat processing

    now offers bottlers improved

    sustainable processing opportunities for the future’

    Coconut water has become more popular in recent years and Dr David Hammond showed us the differences between coconut water, milk and cream with pictorial and schematic demonstrations of the manufacturing process. The analytical composition was reviewed in order to show what authentic product should analytically look like.

    Rounding off the session we were delighted that Maria Norlin of Tetra Pak gave us the Worlds first presentation on Tetra Pak’s new low energy technology for the processing of juices and still juice based drinks. The new combination of micro filtration with heat processing now offers bottlers improved sustainable processing opportunities for the future.

    Final analysis

    The next session provided a focus on analysis. Colour is an important quality criterion for juice products and Christian Jansen of Hunter Lab reminded us how consumers react to colour and then showed different scales that can be used for measurement. It was completed with a practical application for use by manufacturers. Brix measurement is very common in the juice industry but how well is the science of measuring soluble solids understood? Mathis Kuchejda of Schmidt and Haensch took us back to basics with the theory and how it is applied with commercial measuring equipment, guiding the audience through some of the challenges presented by the user.

    Moving onto microbiology Carina Post of Doehler presented the topic on heat resistant mould, informing the workshop of the main species of concern with their characteristics, spoilage types and control strategies that should be applied.

    The juice industry is proud of the authentic nature of its products and the care that goes into maintaining that enviable status. As one of the leading organisations in this field Dr Susanne Koswig of SGF International presented a definition of fraud, along with the control strategies that are applied along the supply chain. Demonstrating successful outcomes, continued vigilance is necessary, and it was shown how SGF continues to partner and support the juice industry to that end.

    The workshop was completed by myself representing the IFU on the Codex Alimentarius structure and operations. Some of the key guidelines impacting the juice industry were reviewed and that changes that are coming along were also shown.

    It was announced that the 2020 workshop will take place in March in Vienna.

     

     

    By Caroline Calder Features
  • 16 May
    Kenyan Juice Tycoon Kimani Rugendo Secures USD11 Million Loan From German Fund

    Kenyan Juice Tycoon Kimani Rugendo Secures USD11 Million Loan From German Fund

    Kevian Kenya, a juice manufacturing company owned by Kenyan multi-millionaire businessman Kimani Rugendo, has secured an USD11 million facility from Deutsche Investitions- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft (DEG), a Development Finance Institution owned by the German government.

    According to a press statement issued by Kevian Kenya, the USD11 million loan facility will be used to finance the company’s expansion of its production facilities. Rugendo said the company will also use part of the funds to develop a new range of beverages targeted at children and young adults. This is the second funding Kevian Kenya has received from DEG following a USD7 million loan DEG issued to the juice manufacturer in 2012.

    Kevian, which started producing beverages in 1995, is based in Thika, an industrial town north of Nairobi. It is one of the largest beverage companies in East Africa. The company produces bottled water, fruit juices, malt drinks, coffee, and tomato paste. The company has more than 800 direct employees and revenues in excess of USD20 million according to information disclosed to this writer by a prominent investment bank in Kenya.

    Forbes.com

    By Caroline Calder News
  • 16 May
    GLOBAL – New whey protein hydrolysate adding sparkle to sports drinks

    GLOBAL – New whey protein hydrolysate adding sparkle to sports drinks

    The advanced 100 % whey protein hydrolysate solution from Arla Foods is specially developed for formulating sparkling protein waters.

    Full-scale factory trials have shown that Lacprodan® HYDRO.Clear can be used to produce sparkling water products with up to 6 % protein. This makes it straightforward for sports drinks manufacturers to create crystal-clear, sparkling, high-protein RTD beverages with strong health credentials.

    Lacprodan® HYDRO.Clear is fat and sugar-free and delivers optimized taste, a low bitterness profile and long shelf life. It is lactose-free, low in energy, very low in salt and easy to flavour.

    SPORTS DRINKS STATS

    Sales of sports protein drinks increased by an average of 9.5 % a year between 2013 and 2017 and are forecast to grow by 8.4 % annually between 2018 and 2022 SAY Euromonitor. Sales of functional and fortified waters, meanwhile, rose by 4 % a year from 2013-2017 and are forecast to grow by 6 % a year from 2018-2022. The carbonates segment is also robust, with a 22 % a year increase in new launches globally between 2007 and 2017 say Innova Market Insights.

    By Caroline Calder News
  • 16 May
    GLOBAL – Döhler Group acquires majority stake in ZUCASA

    GLOBAL – Döhler Group acquires majority stake in ZUCASA

    Döhler Group and Zumos Catalano Aragoneses S.A. (ZUCASA) have reached an agreement on the acquisition of the majority of shares in ZUCASA by the Döhler Group. Döhler will manage ZUCASA’s juice production facility located in the Huesca region through its subsidiary Döhler Fraga S.L.

    For Döhler, this transaction marks another great step forward in one of Europe’s largest fruit production areas. Customers will benefit from a more diverse offering in the stone fruits segment as well as in apples and pears; furthermore, the combined businesses will offer greater efficiency in a global market with regard to customised all-in-one solutions.

    ZUCASA’s extensive expertise and ability to provide fruit and vegetable juices, purees and concentrates for food and beverages, combined with the broad product portfolio and the comprehensive industry knowledge of the Döhler Group, will create unique synergy effects.

    In the coming years, Döhler Group aims to set a benchmark within the sector and develop a plan of expansion and sustainable growth within its business model.

    doehler.com

    By Caroline Calder News
  • 16 May
    ADM deal to buy citrus specialist Ziegler

    ADM deal to buy citrus specialist Ziegler

    GLOBAL – ADM has reached an agreement to acquire the Ziegler Group, a leading European provider of natural citrus flavour ingredients. The agreement comes shortly after ADM completed its addition of US -based citrus flavour provider Florida Chemical.

    Vince Macciocchi, president of ADM’s Nutrition business, said, “Ziegler is highly respected as a cutting-edge leader in citrus, and we’re excited to welcome their outstanding leadership and talent to ADM. The combination of Ziegler and Florida Chemical will immediately position ADM for growth as a global leader in natural citrus ingredients, with a complete range of innovative citrus solutions and systems for food, beverage and fragrance customers.”

    Founded in 1963, Ziegler uses proprietary cold concentration technologies to produce natural high-quality citrus oils, extracts, concentrates and compounds for flavour, food, and beverage industry customers, focusing on Europe, the US and Japan. The company is privately held and headquartered in Aufsess, in Southern Germany. ADM are one of the world’s largest food ingredient providers today, providing ingredients such as emulsifiers and sweetening solutions for the confectionery industry.

    “Citrus is one of the fastest-growing, highest-demand flavours for food and beverages, which is why the creation of a global citrus platform offering a complete product line for our customers is such an important capability for our growth strategy,” Macciocchi continued. “We’re continuing the most ambitious portfolio transformation in our company’s long history, and as we build the world’s leading nutrition company, the beneficiaries will be our customers and our shareholders.”

    The deal is expected to close near the end of 2019.

    By Caroline Calder News