• 15 Mar
    Russia and a growing thirst for juice

    Russia and a growing thirst for juice

     

    Features of juice consumption in Russia

    According to the Russian Union of Juice Producers, the Russian juice market equates to some 2.5 billion litres of juice products per year.

    On average it reaches nearly 15 litres per capita consumption, which means Russia has a great potential for consumption growth say the union. Russians consume on average one glass of juice a day.

    History

    The history of the juice industry in Russia began more than 120 years ago, in 1897; the first production of pasteurized grape juice was opened in the Crimea. From this point on juices have become an important part of the Russian diet.

    By 1990, the canning industry in the territory of modern Russia produced about 550 million litres of juice and nectars, but consumption significantly exceeded this figure and the missing volume was imported from the southern republics of the Soviet Union, as well as from Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania and Poland. At that time, most enterprises produced juice and nectars from local raw materials, mainly from apples and tomatoes. Usually juices were packed in glass bottles or jars of 1 and 3 litre.

    Active introduction of carton packaging and aseptic filling began with the development of the what the union called the ‘new’ Russian juice industry, starting with Tetra-Brik Aseptic equipment.

    Today juice production industry in Russia has made great strides: advanced technologies and international quality standards are being introduced, research is being conducted on the effect of juices on the human body, and the raw material base is being strengthened.

    Russian taste preferences

    According to surveys, residents of Russia primarily prefer apple (17%) and mixed with apple (28%) juices, followed by multifruit (13%), orange (13%) and tomato (8%).

    Traditional Russians drink derived from berries taken as ‘mors’* – such as cranberry mors, blueberry mors, cherry mors.

    *Mors (Russian: морс) is a non-carbonated Russian fruit drink prepared from berries, mainly from lingonberry and cranberry (although sometimes blueberries, strawberries or raspberries). It’s made by boiling berries with sugar or just mixing pure juice with sweetened water.

    Key producers

    Russian Union of Juice Producers unites enterprises producing about 90% of all juice products manufactured in Russia. The main players of the juice market are such companies as: PepsiCo, Multon, Sady Pridonya, Progress, Southen Juice company, Sunfruit-Trade, Firma Nectar.

    About 65% of Russian juice products come to the shelves at retail in the form of nectars, 20% are juices, and 15% are mors and juice-containing drinks.

    Production geography

    According to researchers Nielsen, half of Russian production of mineral water falls on 9 regions: Karachaevo-Cherkessia , Moscow Region, Stavropol Territory, Lipetsk Region, Novosibirsk region, Tatarstan, Samara region , Sverdlovsk region and Krasnodar region.

    As for sweet carbonated beverages, their main share is produced at the plants of Coca Cola and PepsiCo companies located in the Moscow, Leningrad, Samara, Orel, Sverdlovsk, Novosibirsk and Rostov regions, as well as in the Primorsky, Krasnoyarsk and Krasnodar regions.

    The production of juices and nectars is concentrated in St. Petersburg city and the Leningrad Region. Such regions as Lipetsk, Moscow , Volgograd, Perm, and Krasnodar also accounted for a significant share of production.

    Juice packaging

    Three main packaging types are spread on the Russian market: aseptic bags made of combined material (packaged juices), glass packaging – from simple 3litre jars to branded bottles of unique shape, and PET bottles. Approximately 85% of juice products are packaged in carton, about 12% in glass. A new type of packaging – PET bottles – in Russia holds no more than 5% of the market, while in Europe plastic bottles won an average of 30% with variations from country to country.

    About us

    Russian Union of Juice Producers (RSPS) is a voluntary non-profit organization that unites 24 enterprises developing the market of juice products in Russia. Since 1999, RSPS supports equal conditions of competition in the industry, develops and implements technical regulations and national standards, conducts systematic scientific research of juice products, promotes healthy diet and lifestyle.

    Source: Russian Union of Juice Producers, Nielsen data

     

     

    By Caroline Calder Features
  • 15 Mar
    Aloe Vera

    Aloe Vera

    Aloe Vera

    The Supercharged Rehydration Ingredient – an overview of the opportunity by IPS-Ingredis – the industry is expected to grow around 10% annually over the next 6-8 years.

    It generally takes us around 30 seconds to assess the health of a person. We take into account skin colour and resilience, brightness of eyes, the way someone walks and how they generally hold themselves—do they look strong or fragile, active or sedentary?

    We are what we eat and drink, and nowhere is this more apparent than in the colour and texture of our skin. This can be damaged by smoking or drinking alcohol, spending too long in the sun without skin protection, or consuming diuretics such as strong tea and coffee—even herbal teas with hibiscus or ginger.

    In contrast, foods such as cucumber, celery, water melon, strawberries, courgettes, and cauliflower have high water content that benefits skin hydration. There is one ingredient that is particularly beneficial, and as such, has seen substantial growth in use within the health and fruit drink arena: aloe vera. 

    Skin-cell nourishment

    Also known as Lily of the Desert, this cactus-like plant contains the complex carbohydrate acemannan which nourishes skin cells and detoxifies. Rich in vitamins C, E and beta-carotene, and one of the few plants to contain vitamin B12, aloe vera contains proteolytic enzymes which help repair dead skin cells. The gel has been used for centuries as part of Ayurvedic medicine in the treatment of minor cuts and sores, but it is in beverages such as fruit juice, cold tea blends, yoghurt, and milk-based drinks that it is meeting the needs of millennials and health conscious consumers looking for ingredients that help the skin rehydrate naturally.

    Gut-soothing rehydration

    The alkaline pH balance of aloe vera makes it safe to drink first thing in the morning on an empty stomach and it has a reputation for soothing digestive complaints such as heartburn and gastric ulcers. Unlike most juices, it contains no sugar and few calories yet is rich in antioxidants, boosting immunity and energy levels. A such, the adoption of aloe vera for plant-based beverages has been substantial and looks set to continue.

    Trends and availability

    Trends in aloe vera beverages include ‘between meals’ drinks such as Healthy Choice After Breakfast Juice; OKF’s Alo Exposed: a clear, refreshing, juice drink with aloe vera pieces and honey, also available as Alo Light Refresh with cucumber and cantaloupe; plus Kiki Health Organic aloe ferox juice. Available in Japan is Perfect: the grape and aloe beauty drink, while others evidencing the trend include Simplee Aloe with superberries, and tea companies such as Tetley and Clipper, who are now offering green tea blends with aloe vera in teabag format. Recent additions include T’Best, Ego Drink and Alpro coconut milk yogurt drink. According to Statista, the market was worth USD1.6 billion in 2016 and is expected to be worth USD2.3 billion by 2021.

    Roxanne Sagun, Trade Manager for South East Asia at IPS-Ingredis said:

    “Demand in the industry is expected to grow around 10% annually over the next 6-8 years. Supply for the aloe drinks business has grown about 10-15% each year since 2014, and is expected to have similar growth for the next couple of years.”

    The demand for aloe vera products continues to grow in the northern and western hemispheres, with more research-based evidence coming to light that indicates significant health and beauty benefits from this super ingredient. Though aloe vera has a naturally bitter taste, it is usually diced and blended with honey or sweeter fruits in beverages. The growing possibility of flavour infusions like these in aloe vera drinks makes it an attractive formulation for beverage companies around the world. The aloe vera ingredient is still growing in market presence and availability, so knowing where and how to source the ingredient becomes equally important in developing the right profile for shelf products.

    Ross Cumming, Chief Operating Officer at IPS-Ingredis added:

    “The IPS-Ingredis Digital Platform, supported by our team of international trade experts, enables global buyers to extend their reach in sourcing trending ingredients such as aloe vera, wherever they may be in the world.”

    IPS-Ingredis and Aloe vera

    Global trade company, IPS-Ingredis, has developed one of the very first online platforms for sourcing ingredients. The platform enables buyers anywhere in the world to access key product details and market insights that support the overall buying decision. Not only are we experiencing a global shift in consumer preferences towards healthier and alternative ingredients, but the industry is also becoming more accustomed to these modern methods of trading in raw materials. Aloe vera is one of the popular ingredients available on the IPS-Ingredis Digital Platform, with registered users having access to technical specifications and ability to submit digital quote requests 24/7.

    Sourcing aloe vera and alternative ingredients worldwide has never been so convenient, with the IPS-Ingredis Digital Platform.

     

    About IPS-Ingredis

    Sourced with the utmost care to ensure the best product profile for your goods. Supplied by a team focused on the optimal way to get you what you need, quickly and reliably. IPS-Ingredis helps you secure quality ingredients, concentrates, additives, and flavours, in a cost optimized way. From anywhere around the world. Now on the first worldwide digital trading platform. Email: rushee.ramchuran@ipsingredis.com, Tel: +971 56 422 5725 www.ipsingredis.com.

    By Caroline Calder Features
  • 15 Mar
    Northern Ireland and the ‘Brexit backstop’

    Northern Ireland and the ‘Brexit backstop’

    Brexit and the ‘Backstop’

     

    Comment from Michael Bell, Executive Director, Northern Ireland Food and Drink Association

    “Given our land border with the EU and our reliance on export markets, it is clear that we face unique challenges posed by Brexit. It is important to stress that whilst Great Britain imports 50% of its food and drink, Northern Ireland exports 80%, so we are particularly sensitive to any potential barriers to export.

    “The ideal outcome for the industry would be that we can continue to trade with the EU as normal – without any changes to tariffs and standards. We have submitted technical papers to the government on behalf of the industry to advise on the particular issues which face the NI agri-food sector and we have provided information on solutions that would minimise disruption to trade.

    “We are actively involved in engaging with government to avoid a no-deal situation at all costs as this would be devastating to our industry and would result in immediate chaos along the supply chain. We currently have no reassurances about our ability to continue frictionless trade with other key markets post-Brexit. It is very difficult to develop solid contingency plans whenever there has been little to no information about what will happen after March 29th. Businesses cannot invest in alternative arrangements when they don’t know what those arrangements should be!

    “As a representative body for the leading agri-food businesses in Northern Ireland, we have voiced our support for the backstop as it offers vital assurances to our members. We recognise that some amendments may be required to the current backstop proposal, and we are happy to engage with politicians as they continue to seek a solution.”

    NIFDA

    NIFDA is a voluntary organisation committed to helping Northern Ireland food and drink companies compete successfully and to representing and promoting their interests.  It was established to provide services to enhance, promote, inform, educate and develop our members’ business.

    NIFDA’s vision is a strong and united membership working together towards a sustainable and growing internationally competitive food and drink industry in Northern Ireland. We are committed to maximising the growth potential of the industry and growing turnover to £7bn by 2020 by export led growth.

     

    What is the backstop?

    The backstop is a position of last resort, to maintain an open border on the island of Ireland in the event that the UK leaves the EU without securing an all-encompassing deal.

    At present, goods and services are traded between the two jurisdictions on the island of Ireland with few restrictions.

    The UK and Ireland are currently part of the EU single market and customs union, so products do not need to be inspected for customs and standards.

     

    By Caroline Calder Features News
  • 15 Mar
    NIGERIA – Coca-Cola Nigeria deal

    NIGERIA – Coca-Cola Nigeria deal

    The Coca-Cola company has completed its purchase of Nigerian juice and dairy company Chi, three years after buying an initial 40% stake. Headquartered in Lagos, Chi produces juice and iced tea under its Chivita brand, value-added dairy products under the Hollandia brand, as well as a range of snacks.

    According to Coca-Cola, juices and value-added dairy categories rank among the fastest-growing beverage segments in Nigeria and Africa. The company said the acquisition further signals its optimism about Africa’s consumer opportunity and a commitment to its long-term investment and growth plan on the continent, where it has been present for more than 90 years.

    Brandspurng.com

     

    By Caroline Calder News
  • 15 Mar
    CANADA & USA – Cott Beverages sells soft drink production business

    CANADA & USA – Cott Beverages sells soft drink production business

    Cott Corporation has announced the sale of its soft drink concentrate production business and its RCI International division (Cott Beverages LLC) to Refresco for USD50 million, who in turn sold the RCI worldwide branded activities to RC Global Beverages Inc.

    Cott Beverages LLC is a leading developer and manufacturer of soft drink concentrates for bottlers in more than 70 countries, generating approximately USD80 million in sales during 2018 including concentrate production directly supporting Refresco’s beverage manufacturing business.

    “This transaction is the final step in the transformation of our business where selling the remaining business unit of the traditional carbonated soft drinks business is consistent with our strategy of accelerating the growth across our platform in water, coffee, tea, extracts and filtration solutions,” commented Tom Harrington, Cott’s Chief Executive Officer.

    Hans Roelofs, CEO Refresco comments: “We are pleased to add Cott’s Columbus concentrate manufacturing facility to Refresco North America. It adds extensive innovation capabilities and skills and creates a global centre of excellence for beverage concentrate manufacturing. It is a perfect fit with our business. We have decided to divest the RCI International branded activities and find an owner who can bring similar focus and continuity to this iconic brand. With RC Global Beverages Inc.The sale of Columbus from Cott to Refresco and the sale of the RCI International activities from Refresco to RC Global Beverages Inc. took place simultaneously.”

     

    Cott.com

     

    By Caroline Calder News
  • 15 Mar
    Toxic metals – getting it straight

    Toxic metals – getting it straight

    The Juice Products Association (JPA) is calling on consumer reports to stop raising unnecessary alarm about levels of heavy metals in fruit juices and other foods and to base its recommendations on transparent, substantiated science.

    In response to the Consumer Reports article, “Arsenic and Lead are in Your Fruit Juice: What You Need to Know,” JPA stated, “The article needlessly and irresponsibly alarms consumers. There is no scientific evidence indicating that the presence of trace levels of heavy metals in juice has caused any negative health outcomes among individuals at any life stage.”

    The article claims that juice “may contain potentially harmful” levels of heavy metals. “Without any scientific basis for that claim, one could remove the word “juice” and insert any one of hundreds or thousands of foods people eat regularly as evidenced in the data published in the Total Diet Study issued by the US Food and Drug Administration,” said Patricia Faison, technical director, Juice Products Association.

    Consumer Reports’ analysis is not transparent. Its article advises consumers to limit juice consumption but does not disclose the actual levels of heavy metals found in the juices they tested. The Juice Products Association has requested the testing data from Consumer Reports for its own analysis and believes that consumers should also have access to the full testing data. Consumer Reports has declined to share this information.

    This media outlet is not a regulatory or scientific body, such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The “risk assessment” information from Consumer Reports does not present a scientific assessment of risk to public health and does not appear to have been peer-reviewed, as is customary with scientific research. An assessment of health risk must be based on sound science and according to data recently collected by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Total Diet Study, there is no health risk from heavy metals in juices.

    “It is a fact that substances such as lead, arsenic and cadmium exist throughout the environment, and are absorbed by plants. Trace, harmless levels of these substances may exist in juice, and other foods,” said Ms. Faison. “Juice producers are very interested in reviewing sound science as a way to continuously improve our products and are committed to providing safe, high-quality, nutritious juice that meets or exceeds regulations established by the FDA for food safety. Companies conduct their own routine testing and are being innovative in their sourcing and production methods to further reduce levels. Consumers do not need to be concerned about the safety of juice.”

    Juice producers make safety a priority 365-days-a-year, and believe the concerns cited by Consumer Reports’ intermittent testing of selected products are unfounded. Consumers can be assured that juice is safe. Regardless of where the ingredients are sourced or where the juice is processed, all juice producers are required to manufacture products that comply with FDA regulations.

    The Juice Products Association is the trade association representing the fruit and juice products industry. www.sipsmarter.org.

     

    By Caroline Calder Features News
  • 15 Mar
    INDIA – Givaudan opens new state-of-the-art Flavours manufacturing facility in India

    INDIA – Givaudan opens new state-of-the-art Flavours manufacturing facility in India

    Givaudan has officially inaugurated a new flavours manufacturing facility in Pune, India. The CHF60 million plant is the company’s largest investment in India.

    The new 40,000 square metre facility will enable Givaudan to meet growing demand from customers in the food and beverage and health care segments. The facility will also complement the company’s existing plant in Daman, strengthening its capabilities in liquids compounding, powder blending, emulsions, process flavours and spray drying for the India, Nepal and Bangladesh markets. Givaudan expects to employ about 200 people at the new site.

    The new facility is also making important contributions to Givaudan’s Climate Action Agenda by becoming the Company’s first Zero Liquid Discharge site, which ensures all waste water is purified and recycled at the end of the treatment cycle. Energy efficient LED lighting technology has also been fitted throughout the site to reduce COemissions and plans are under development to incorporate solar panels, contributing towards Givaudan’s 100% renewable energy target. Over 1,100 trees have also been planted to support the preservation of the local ecosystem.

    givaudan.com

     

    By Caroline Calder News
  • 15 Mar
    GLOBAL – New Tetra Pak CEO appointed​

    GLOBAL – New Tetra Pak CEO appointed​

    The Tetra Laval Group Board has appointed Mr Adolfo Orive, President & CEO of Tetra Pak effective 1 April 2019. The appointment follows the decision by Mr Dennis Jönsson to step down from his position after 14 years as President & CEO and 36 years with the company.

    Adolfo Orive, presently Cluster Vice President North Central and South America, joined Tetra Pak in 1993. Prior to his present position he has had several managerial positions in the Group, including Managing Director of Colombia, Spain and Cluster Vice President North and Central Europe. He joined the Tetra Pak Global Leadership Team in 2014.

    Mr Orive, who is 55 years old, has a bachelor’s degree in Industrial Engineering at Ibero-American University (IBERO), Mexico and a Master’s in Business Administration at Mexico Autonomous Institute of Technology (ITAM), Mexico.

    Tetra Pak

     

    By Caroline Calder News